WhyBone Broth Is Essential to Healthy Eating

If you want to transform your well-being in 2019 by eating healthy, bone broth can be a key to helping you stay with your plan because It’s so much easier to make healthy choices if your food is delicious and satisfying.  And you know how scrumptious Mountain Meadow Bone Broth is.

The Yummy Factor

The yummy factor in bone broth is called “umami,” the fifth taste (in addition to sweet, salty, sour and bitter) of savory satisfaction that is stimulated by glutamates and certain other amino acids. Scientists think that humans developed a taste for umami because it signals the presence of protein. That’s why foods that provide proteins broken down into free amino acids offer the most satisfying umami taste. 

Mountain Meadow Bone Broth provides that extra punch of umami from roasting the bones before the long, slow simmer.  Both these processes break the complete proteins into the amino acid building blocks.

When we eat umami-rich foods with proteins already broken down, we use much less energy to digest, and the amino acids are put to work immediately.  The added bonus of this process is that we feel satiated quicker.  Think about a baby feeding on umami-rich breast milk.  As soon as she’s full, she pushes away from the mother. 

Eating foods rich in umami, like bone broth, give you the feeling of being fed.  That’s why bone broth and anything made with it are quintessential comfort foods.

The bottom line: umami-rich foods like bone broth give you a sense of fullness and completion so that you can maintain a healthy weight.  Win-win!

One of the challenges to getting umami tastes in our food is that it often requires lots of time.  Our life-styles rarely allow us to spend hours in the kitchen.  Mountain Meadow Bone Broth can solve that problem because we spend the time cooking the deep flavor, so you don’t have to.

Here are two 30-minutes meals that are sure to satisfy.

Buddha Bowls

This is really more a process than a specific recipe.  You can use the same process to create any number of different meals, each with a different taste, depending on what veggies, seasonings and protein you use.  Experiment and try new combinations!  

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  1. Cook a favorite grain (rice, quinoa, barley) by substituting half the water with Mountain Meadow Bone Broth.

    Note – If you are not eating grains, steam some greens instead

  2. While the grain is cooking, sauté your favorite veggies (or whatever you have on hand).  Be sure to use a healthy fat like grass-fed butter or ghee, coconut oil, or avocado oil. Add salt, pepper and garlic to taste.  (Or any other seasoning you like).

  3. Add a little left over protein (meatloaf, chicken, beans) or add uncooked protein of your choice. Be sure it is cut into small pieces for quicker cooking.

  4. Add a little broth (about ¼ cup for each cup of veggies)

  5. Cover and simmer on low until the veggies are tender, and meat is cooked.

  6. Serve the sautee over grain (or steamed greens) in a big bowl.

Quick Tip - You could prepare the grain ahead of time by making a big batch on the weekend.  If cutting up the veggies feels like a chore at the end of the day, you can batch prep them as well.

 

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Curried Butternut Squash Soup

Ingredients:

1 medium diced onion

2 or more minced cloves of garlic

1 medium butternut squash (cut into 1 inch pieces)

1 tablespoon healthy fat (grass-fed butter or ghee, coconut oil, avocado oil)

1 tablespoon curry powder

1 can full fat coconut milk

1 pint Mountain Meadow Bone Broth (either chicken or beef)

 

  1. In a large, heavy pot, heat a healthy fat. Add curry powder and cook for 1 minute.

  2. Add the onion.  Cook until translucent.

  3. Add squash pieces and cook for 5 – 7 minutes

  4. Add coconut milk and Mountain Meadow Bone Broth. Simmer until the squash is soft.

  5. Use an immersion blender to puree.  (Or do in batches in a blender).  Add water or broth if it is too thick. 

  6. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Eileen McGurty