How Chicken Broth Fights the Common Cold and Flu

Grandma was right.  Chicken soup does help you recover from the cold or flu. 

A whole food diet that regularly includes premium bone broth -- from any type of animal --- boosts your immune system for long term wellness and health.  There are three main ways that bone broth is good for your overall ability to fight infection:

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  • Bone broth contains with several inflammation-reducing compounds that heal the gut.  Since the health of our immune system is directly linked to the health of our gut and our gut lining, a healthy gut means a better ability to fight infection.

    “A huge proportion of your immune system is actually in your GI tract,” says Dan Peterson, assistant professor of pathology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. [1] 

  • One of the amino acids in bone broth, glycine, helps several different types of immune cells to reduce inflammatory responses that may damage lungs and other tissues. [2]

  • And another compound in bone broth has been shown to influence the function B cells and T cells, two of the most important immune system cells. [3]

Chicken Broth and the Common Cold

Even if you do build immunity with bone broth, sometimes you do catch a cold.  After all, the rhinovirus is everywhere, spreads easily, and is stronger in the cold weather. 

When you feel a sniffle coming on or start to get achy all over, break out the chicken broth.  It contains all the goodness of bone broth for long term immune health plus the chicken has additional benefits to ease the acute symptoms of the common cold and flu. 

Stops the runny nose:  Research shows that chicken broth helps to reduce the inflammatory compounds that contribute to the runny nose, sneezing and cough we get with colds and the flu. According to several studies, the amino acid, carnosine, provides potent anti-inflammatory action.  And chicken broth has lots and lots of carnosine.  [4]

Gets rid of the mucous: Chicken is also rich in the amino acid, cysteine, which thins mucous and helps the cilia, those tiny hairs lining the bronchi and lungs, to move mucous up and out of the lungs. [5]

Keeps you hydrated: Grandma’s chicken soup, made from real bone broth (not from a box) is mostly liquid, so it prevents dehydration.  If you are sweating from a fever, it is extra important to stay hydrated.  Broth is much better than juice when you have a cold or flu because it contains easily digestible protein to help you stay nourished.  So reach for the chicken broth instead of pumping yourself up with all that sugar from juice.

Fight back with Cold Busting Chicken Soup

One option when you have a cold is to simply heat up a cup of Mountain Meadow Chicken Bone Broth and sip it, as is.  But two easy additions can give you an even bigger boost to fighting your cold.  There is some evidence that both garlic and ginger can fight viruses, like those that cause the common cold. [6] Also, studies have shown that both garlic and ginger are effective at fighting bacteria. [7]  Even though common cold and flu are viruses, being sick makes you more vulnerable to bacterial infection, as well.  Garlic and ginger will help keep that risk low – plus they taste fantastic!

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1 cup Mountain Meadow Chicken Bone Broth

1 clove minced garlic

½ inch chopped fresh ginger

Salt and pepper to taste

Put all the ingredients in a small sauce pan and heat slowly.  Sip and enjoy!

Join our subscription plan so that you have plenty of Mountain Meadow Chicken Bone Both on hand during cold and flu season!

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Notes

1. https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/research/advancements-in-research/fundamentals/in-depth/the-gut-where-bacteria-and-immune-system-meet

2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10926563

3. http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.585.5224&rep=rep1&type=pdf

4.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11035691

5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15281093

6. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23123794

7. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23569978